Cold Hesledon

Cold Hesledon

Pemberton Arms pub, Cold Hesledon

Pemberton Arms pub, Cold Hesledon

Available Parish Registers at Durham Record Office

St. Andrew’s, Dalton-le-Dale, Baptisms 1653-1917
St. Andrew’s, Dalton-le-Dale, Marriages 1653-1971
St. Andrew’s, Dalton-le-Dale, Burials 1653-1893
United Methodist Free Church, Cold Hesledon, Baptisms 1893-1960
Stockton Road Methodist Chapel, Cold Hesledon, Marriages 1946-71

For other Cold Hesledon records before and after the opening of the Methodist Chapel in c. 1893 consult the parish records for Murton or Dalton-le-Dale.

Population changes in the 19th. Century were:

1801 1811 1821 1831 1841 1851 1861 1871 1881 1891 1901
Cold Hesledon 48 31 55 112 83 117 89 99 108 682 899

The above census records for 1841-1901 are transcribed and available on this site.

Previously an exclusively agricultural community Cold Hesledon was rudely thrust into the modern world when Colonel Thomas Braddyll pushed through a waggonway in 1831-33 to connect his new colliery at South Hetton with the new port and town of Seaham Harbour. The one-pub village expanded considerably in the 1880s to deal with the overflow of population from the expanding Murton Colliery. Many of these newcomers were Methodists who soon organised themselves a chapel. Cold Hesledon ‘events’ which otherwise might have been recorded at St. Andrew’s instead appear in the registers of Cold Hesledon United Methodist Free chapel.

The (mining) village of Cold Hesledon is now long gone, replaced by an industrial estate. The old Waterworks, magnificently Gothic, are currently being renovated to become a late night venue. The pub, the Pemberton Arms, was originally called the Braddyll Arms, then became the Cold Hesledon Inn before adopting its present title. Whatever the official name, it has always been known to regulars as The White House because, it seems, it has always been painted white.

— by Tony Whitehead