Hutton Henry, Sheraton, Hulam & Nesbitt

Hutton Henry, Sheraton, Hulam & Nesbitt

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Parish Church, Hutton Henry

 Hutton Henry

Available Parish Registers at Durham Record Office
St. Mary, Monk Hesleden, Baptisms 1578-1948
St. Mary, Monk Hesleden, Marriages 1578-1925
St. Mary, Monk Hesleden, Baptisms 1578-1908
St. Francis, Hutton Henry, Marriages 1926-54
Hutton House RC, Hutton Henry, Baptisms 1808-39
Hutton Henry Wesleyan Chapel, Baptisms 1878-1935

In the distant past, Hutton Henry was far too small ever to have its own church or even a chapel. It was in the parish of Monk Hesleden so look there for the ancient records. Now, despite its size, it has its own Anglican church, RC church and Methodist chapel.

Population changes in the 19th. Century were:

1801 1811 1821 1831 1841 1851 1861 1871 1881 1891 1901
Hutton Henry 156 155 174 162 287 1067 392 539 1825 3151 2578

The above returns are for ‘Greater Hutton Henry’ which included the village of that name, outlying farms and Hutton Henry Colliery (c. 1869-97) which area eventually came to be known as Station Town. The above census records for 1841-1901 are transcribed and available on this site.

The name Hutton Henry is of Scandinavian origin. Hutton means ‘high farm’. Henry derives from Henry de Eshe, who was the lord of the manor and local landowner in the 14th. Century. The community layout is typical of those Durham villages laid out in the 12th. and 13th. centuries – a main street bordered on both sides by extensive grassed areas; with dwellings lying together some distance from the road.

The Anglican church of St. Francis was built in 1867 to serve the village and the nearby settlements of Sheraton and Hulam. There is also a Methodist chapel and St. Peter and St. Paul’s RC church. The presbytery of this RC church is known as Hutton House. The current Catholic church was constructed in 1895 on the site of a former place of worship (1825). Hutton Henry today has just one pub, the ancient Plough, scene of many an inquest in times gone by.

Conventional wisdom has it that Hutton Henry Colliery began in 1869. There is no trace of sinkers or coalminers in the 1871 census however. There was definitely a colliery by 1881 but it was some way from the old village, almost a mile to the northeast. The community that built up around it became known as Station Town. There were just 6 households at what would become Station Town in 1871. Also the old mining village at South Wingate Colliery (closed c. 1857) was used to house other Hutton Henry Colliery workers. There were a few miners billeted in Hutton Henry village as well but it remained primarily an agricultural community.

Station Town had 153 households by 1881. Hutton Henry had couple of dozen miners as well in that year for the first time. There were far more in 1891. There were 396 households at Station Town by 1891. The 1891 enumerator listed the following there: Station Lane, Gladstone Street, Wingate Station, ‘Station Town’, Collwill Building, Front Street, East Terrace, ‘Acclom’ (Acklam ?) Street, Vane Street, Rodridge Street, Gargen Street, Millbank (or Milbanke) Terrace, East View and ‘Hutton Henry Colliery’.

Hutton Henry Colliery, never very profitable, closed in 1897. This spelt doom for the village of South Wingate but Station Town eventually grew and linked up with Wingate. Hutton Henry village lost all of its coalminers and reverted to its agricultural traditions. Today the nearest coalmine is over a hundred miles away.

Sheraton

Sheraton was far too small ever to have its own church or even a chapel. It was in the parish of Monk Hesleden so look there for the ancient records. Now it is in the parish of Hutton Henry so it may also be worthwhile checking those records.

Population changes in the 19th. Century were:

1801 1811 1821 1831 1841 1851 1861 1871 1881 1891 1901
Sheraton 99 97 116 110 147 128 139 149 176 173 158

Sheraton never had a coal mine of its own. The nearest were South Wingate (c. 1840-57), Castle Eden (1840-93) and Hutton Henry (c. 1869-97). Sheraton was one of the few communities in Easington District to be completely unaffected by the exploitation of coal reserves. There were never any resident miners according to the census returns 1841-91 inclusive. As the above three collieries all closed in the 19th. Century Sheraton has been distant from coalmining for generations. The above census figures for 1881-1901 inclusive include the returns for the tiny hamlet of Hulam.

Hulam

Hulam was far too small ever to have its own church or even a chapel. It was in the parish of Monk Hesleden so look there for the ancient records. Now it is in the parish of Hutton Henry so it may also be worthwhile checking those records.

Population changes in the 19th. Century were:

1801 1811 1821 1831 1841 1851 1861 1871 1881 1891 1901
Hulam 7 11 16 15 11 19 13 27 Merged with Sher’n

Hulam never had a coal mine. The nearest were South Wingate (c. 1840-57), Castle Eden (1840-93) and Hutton Henry (c. 1869-97). Hulam was one of the few communities in Easington District to be completely unaffected by the exploitation of coal reserves. There were never any resident miners. As the above three collieries all closed in the 19th. century Hulam has been distant from coalmining for generations. From 1881-1901 inclusive the census returns for the tiny hamlet were included in those for Sheraton.

Nesbitt

Nesbitt was far too small ever to have its own church or even a chapel. It was and is in the parish of Hart (which is outside Easington District) so look there for the ancient records for Nesbitt. An alternative might be Monk Hesleden whose church is about the same distance away from Nesbitt but with a dene in between.

Available Parish Registers at Durham Record Office
…those listed above for Hutton Henry, plus…
Hart Parish Registers 1577-1979

Population changes in the 19th. Century were:

1801 1811 1821 1831 1841 1851 1861 1871 1881 1891 1901
Nesbitt 5 5 9 10 12 11 12 7 10 11 13

Nesbitt never had a coal mine. The nearest were Castle Eden (c. 1840-93), South Wingate (c. 1840-57) and Hutton Henry (c. 1869-97). Nesbitt was one of the few communities in Easington District to be completely unaffected by the exploitation of coal reserves. There were never any resident miners.

Nesbitt Dene, a former quarry, leads down from Nesbitt Hall to Castle Eden Dene. Nesbitt Hall still stands, with its 18th. Century gate. Below is the census return for the solitary Nesbitt family in 1841.

Nesbitt 1841 Census, ‘Nesbitt (HO107/313/8, folio 1a)
Swinburn Ellison, 50, Farmer
Jane E, 45
Mary E, 20
Ann E, 20
Jane E, 15
William E, 12
Eleanor E, 9
Thomas Trotter, 75
Henry Ross, 15, Male Servant
Robert Ross, 15, Male Servant
Joseph Taylorson, 65, Male Servant
Elizabeth Stephenson, 15, Female Servant

— by Tony Whitehead